Saturday, February 22, 2014

Hummingbird Update - Part Two

The lovely Cinnamon Hummingbird is the feature of today's post.  The Cinnamon was the first hummingbird I took a photo of at our place here in Belize.  It was just a fuzzy speck perched on a leafless twig atop a small tree, but the completely cinnamon-colored underside is not found on any other hummingbird around here.  
Over the last 7 years, the Cinnamon has been a continuous  year round resident that we see and hear feeding on the hibiscus flowers in front of our veranda.  They give a single cht before each flower visit, and a series of chts as it flies from bush to bush.  
You can just see a little pale tongue-tip sticking out. 
Before we started living here full-time December of 2012, the Cinnamon was easily spooked by us when we would try to get a better view of it.   Once we had been here for a while it got more used to us and, while still wary, didn't fly away if it saw us on the veranda.  Now that the feeders are up, it (they, actually) is (are) bolder still.  I took these photos of the Cinnamon at the back feeder on 3 different days.  I was only 15-20 feet away, with Max (the cat) at my side, and none of the hummers seemed deterred by our presence.
At 4.25 inches, the Cinnamon is noticeably larger than the 3.5 inch Ruby-throated. 
Notice the black-tipped red bill.
The tail is also cinnamon-colored from above and below, and is bordered with a dark charcoal band.

Still wary, but the allure of the feeder is too strong to resist.
The sexes are indistinguishable.
Its head and back are a shiny greenish-gold color.
From the back you can see the cinnamon-colored tail with tis darker border and the iridescent greenish-gold of the back and head.  Unmistakable and lovely.
Next up will be the dashing Rufous-tailed Hummingbird.





10 comments:

  1. A stunning bird and super pictures Wilma. How lovely to have such a garden sharer!

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    1. Thanks, Phil. Glad that you enjoy them.

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  2. These are really stunning shots!

    Half the problem I have is not having the camera with me when the moment arrives.

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    1. I know what you mean, Nick. For these shots, a sat on the deck near the feeder with the sole intent of getting some photos. The shots in natural surroundings are much harder to get. Thanks for visiting.

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  3. A brilliant series of close shots Wilma.

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    1. Thanks, John. The bright sun allowed a very fast shutter speed to capture wing beats. Some hummingbirds (maybe all?) beat their wings around 200 bpm!

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  4. Wow! Terrific photos! Thank you for sharing.

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    1. Glad you like them, Nan. Hope to get Part Three up tomorrow.

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  5. Great pictures and comments about the hummers. I know how difficult it is to get pictures of these little buzz-bombs. Great work.

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    1. Thanks, Bill - I appreciate your encouraging words!

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